Chill

Warwick House

Case Closed

Mission Summary
At the request of Professor Ellsworth Smythe III, Envoy Emeritus and Distinguished Professor of American Folklore at Severn College, two envoys were dispatched to Severn College to investigate longterm and ongoing activities at Warwick House, a long-abandoned former residence on the campus. The house, vacant for over 200 years, had been the scene of numerous disturbances and mysterious deaths, and seemingly resistant to attempts to demolish the building.

The most recent attempt to raze the building resulted in the seemingly accidental deaths of two construction workers a week before the envoys’ arrival. The envoys, Gordon Brown and Tommy O’Brien, went to the house during the day and found within it evidence of about a century of habitation, from the 1600s through late 1700s, and remarkably well-preserved furniture and structure.

Several manifestations of the Unknown were experienced: a floating noose; blowing wind with a foul stench inside; a large feast, with fresh food; and finally a seemingly preserved corpse, which quickly putrified and attacked once touched. The body turned out to be that of Boyd Baxter, a Severn College student who disappeared in 1966.

After defeating the mindless animated corpse they continued their investigation, moving upstairs and finding more evidence of the Warwicks and their obsession with the ship Mercy, which they sailed on from England to the Colonies.

Upon entering the attic the envoys were directly confronted by the ghosts of both John and Sarah Warwick, and attacked by them. Also found in the attic was the actual keel of the Mercy, along with two nooses. As Gordon tried to make contact by speaking to them to find out what they wanted, Timmy O’Brien lit the nooses on fire, which had an immediate and powerful effect on the ghosts, sending them into spasms and eventual destruction.

Comments

Lyle

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